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davidtrump

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  1. davidtrump
    You can learn a lot about your cat's health from his poop. Whether you’ve just adopted your first kitten or you’ve shared your home with cats for years, watch for a few key signs when you scoop out the litter box.
    Cat Poop: What’s Normal?
    Most cats will poop at least once a day. If they’re healthy, their poop should:
    Be deep brown in color
    Feel not too hard or too soft or mushy
    Not smell too foul, though some odor is normal
    Diarrhea
    Diarrhea is not uncommon for cats, and there are many reasons why your cat might have it. Sometimes, it comes and goes quickly. Other times, it can last for days, weeks, or months, or come back on a regular basis.
    Diarrhea that lasts for 24 to 48 hours probably won’t cause a problem, but if it lasts longer, your cat can get dehydrated, which can be dangerous.
     
    Some common causes of cat diarrhea include:
    Changes to their diet or food allergies or intolerances
    Inflammatory bowel disease
    Colitis
    Hyperthyroidism
    Worms (intestinal parasites)
    Pancreatic disease
    Cancer
    If your cat has diarrhea that lasts more than a day or two, see your veterinarian to figure out the cause. Call your vet right away if the diarrhea is black or bloody, or if it happens along with fever, vomiting, sluggishness, or a loss of appetite.
    The treatment your cat will need depends on what’s causing his diarrhea. Some will need prescription medications, such as metronidazole or prednisolone, to control inflammation. Your vet may recommend a special diet if she thinks a food allergy or intolerance, IBD, or colitis is the problem.

     
     
    To prevent diarrhea, don’t give your cat dairy products like milk or yogurt -- many cats can’t digest them properly. Also, if you switch the brand or type of food you give him, be sure to introduce it over several days by mixing it with smaller and smaller amounts of the old food until he’s eating only the new stuff.
    Constipation
    When a cat is constipated, he’ll strain a lot when he tries to poop or won’t be able to produce anything for the litter box. You don’t need to worry if it only happens sometimes. But if it’s more common for your pet, you should contact your vet.
     
    Cats can get constipated for a number of reasons, including:
    Over-grooming, which leads to extra hair in the digestive tract
    Kidney problems
    Feline megacolon -- when the colon gets very large and its muscles no longer squeeze, making hard, dry stool build up inside
    Something blocking their colon, such as string or bones
    Diets that don’t have enough fiber
    Problems inside the colon, such as tumors or narrow places
    Spine problems or pain
    To ease your cat’s constipation, your vet may suggest that you give him more fiber, such as by adding canned pumpkin to his regular food. Or she might tell you to change to food that’s easier for your pet to digest.
     
    It also helps to make sure he gets more exercise and drinks more water so that waste will move through his system more readily.

  2. davidtrump
    Q: Will diabetes shorten my cat’s lifespan?
    A: It sure can, because it can be associated with infections, with peripheral nerve disorders, and other problems. If it’s poorly controlled you can get into some pretty severe emergency situations. But I can tell you that we see lots of diabetic cats that are older that are managed for many years and they can get into their late teens. It requires a lifelong, daily commitment, but it’s something that can be done.
     
    Q: What does it cost to care for a diabetic cat?
    A: Most clients probably spend about $20-$30 a month on insulin, syringes, and other supplies. It’s not terribly expensive once it’s being managed.
     
    Q: What are the newest treatments for feline diabetes?
     
    A: There are newer insulins that are being evaluated. Some of the insulin analogs that are available for treating human diabetics are being looked at in diabetic cats and they have some promise. These provide more blood sugar control, often with fewer side effects. People are constantly trying to find new and better ways to care for diabetic cats.

  3. davidtrump
    Q: If caught early enough, can my cat be cured of diabetes?
    A: It’s usually not cured. Some cats, when you start treating their diabetes and you get their blood sugar under control and get them on a reasonable diet and get them in a better body condition, their diabetes actually goes into remission or partial remission. There are cats that stay that way for many months. Some might even stay that way for years. It can happen. But for the most part diabetes is a disease that we control and don’t really cure.
     
    Q: Can I prevent my cat from getting diabetes with diet and not letting her get too fat?
    A: Nobody can tell you that you can prevent your cat from getting diabetes with diet because those studies haven’t been done. There are some commonly held beliefs, based on a handful of clinical studies, that support the use of low-carbohydrate diets in helping diabetic cats control their blood sugar better. And we do know that obesity is a risk factor. But there also are some breeds of cats that get diabetes more than others do, so that suggests there may be a genetic component involved as well.
     
    Q: Will it be better for my cat if I cook for her instead of buying her food?
    A: It’s hard to make a decent, balanced diet for a cat if you’re cooking it. You have to make sure they get all the amino acids that they need, and their needs are different from dogs and people and other omnivores. You have to know what you’re doing.
     
    Q: Should I only feed her dry food or just wet food or both?
    A: That’s the raging argument right now. It’s fairly controversial. If you think about what a cat’s natural diet would be, they’re carnivores. So the diet they would eat, if they were running around outside eating the animals that they prey upon, would be a very high-protein, very low-carbohydrate diet. So the argument is, that is what they have evolved to eat and that is healthier for them. So why do we have dry food for cats? Because it’s more convenient for people. Some people just don’t like dealing with canned food. And there are a gazillion cats that eat dry food and don’t get diabetes. We see 20-year-old cats that eat dry food.

  4. davidtrump
    An alarming number of cats are developing diabetes mellitus, which is the inability to produce enough insulin to balance blood sugar, or glucose, levels .Left untreated, it can lead to weight loss, loss of appetite, vomiting ,dehydration, severe depression, problems with motor function, coma, and even death. To find out why so many cats are being diagnosed with diabetes, and what owners can do, WebMD talked to Thomas Graves, a former feline practitioner who is associate professor and section head of small animal medicine at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine. Graves’ research focus is on diabetes and geriatric medicine.
    Q: How common is feline diabetes?
    A: The true incidence isn’t known, but it’s estimated at 0.5% to 2% of the feline population. But it’s also probably under diagnosed.
    Q: What are the signs of diabetes in cats?
     
    A: The main symptoms are increased thirst and increased urination. And while we do see it in cats with appropriate body weight, it’s more common in obese cats. Some cats with diabetes have a ravenous appetite because their bodies cannot use the fuel supplied in their diet.
     
    Q: What’s the treatment for a cat with feline diabetes?
    A: Diet is certainly a component. It’s felt that a low-carbohydrate diet is probably best for cats with diabetes. Treatment is insulin therapy. There are some oral medications, but they have more side effects and are mainly used when insulin can’t be used for some reason. There are blood and urine tests, physical examinations, and behavioral signals, which are used to establish insulin therapy. This is done in conjunction with your veterinarian. We don’t recommend owners adjust insulin therapy on their own because it can be sort of complicated in cats. Most patients come in every three or four months. It’s a good thing to make sure nothing else is going on.

     
     
    Q: Will I have to test my cat’s blood every day and give her shots ?
    A: Usually the blood tests are done during the regular visits with your veterinarian, although people can do them if they’d like. But the owners will have to give their cat shots. People are often afraid of that whole thing. But once you teach an owner how to do it properly, it’s something people find quite easy. Many people even find it a bit empowering, that they can do something like that to help their pet.
     

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