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frankzappa

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  1. The National Police Dog Foundation promotes education and awareness, and raises funds for the purchase, training, and ongoing veterinary care for active and retired police K-9s. In 1998 the National Police Dog Foundation (formally known as the Ventura Police Dog Foundation) began as a local group helping to fund the K-9 program for the City of Ventura, CA. This local volunteer group quickly learned that the lack of resources that exists on a local level, also exists on a national level and that many K-9 agencies simply do not have the funds they need for their K-9 programs. This lack of f
  2. Your dog received all his puppy vaccinations, but what's next? The topic of revaccinating pets has sparked debate and we go over what you should think about. There are times when our dogs need vaccinations as well as pills or injections to keep them at their healthy best. But what happens after they receive this puppy vaccinations? Your dog has received all his necessary puppy vaccinations. Then a year or so later, you receive a reminder from your veterinary clinic to book an appointment for your dog to receive booster shots. If you question if these revaccinations do more harm than good,
  3. In 1938, the first year a population survey was conducted, only 29 whooping cranes remained in the wild. Three years later, only 16 were left. Hunting and reduction of their wetland habitat had vitiated the population and concerted efforts to salvage remnant birds did not being until the late 1960s. Today, there are over 400 birds, thanks in large part to innovative breeding programs. Though a plan that involved transferring whooping crane eggs to the nests of related sandhill cranes for fostering ultimately failed, captive rearing and reintroduction have established two wild populations in Fl
  4. There are fewer than 25,000 blue whales, the largest animals on the planet. Comprising several subspecies, blue whales are found in all of the world’s oceans save the Arctic. The current population is thought to have been reduced by up to 90% by whaling in the 20th century. Commercial hunting of the species was ultimately banned in 1966. The National Marine Fisheries Service of the U.S. spelled out a recovery plan in 1998. It stipulated the maintenance of photo databases of individual specimens and the collection of genetic and migration data in order to better understand the species, which re
  5. The luxurious waterproof coat that insulates sea otters from the chilly waters that they inhabit almost led to its extinction. A target of the commercial fur trade, the species was almost wiped out, with only some 2,000 of an estimated 300,000 left by 1911. That year, an international ban on commercial hunting was enacted. Though that ban, along with management and conservation measures taken in the wake of the 1972 Marine Mammal Protection Act, have helped populations recover to perhaps a third of their earlier numbers, they are highly vulnerable to both natural phenomena such as killer whale
  6. Though it’s called a leopard—and certainly resembles a frosted version of those spotted habitués of more equatorial regions—the snow leopard is actually more closely related to the tiger, at least per genetic analysis. Probably fewer than 6,500 remain in the wild, though due to the remote mountainous terrain preferred by the species, and its elusive nature, data is hard to come by. The largest populations are in China and Mongolia, with significant populations in India and Kyrgyzstan as well. Its natural prey include blue sheep and ibex, but in some areas, it is heavily dependent on domestic a
  7. Between 1996 and 2008, the population of Tasmanian devils dropped some 60% due a contagious cancer known as Devil Facial Tumour Disease. It continues to decimate populations of the species, which only occurs on the Australian island of Tasmania. There may only be 10,000 wild individuals remaining. Captive breeding of uninfected individuals has been instituted and efforts have been made to develop a vaccine for the cancer, which is thought to have stemmed from mutated cells from a single specimen.
  8. Depending on who you ask, there are either two species of gorilla, the eastern (Gorilla beringei) and western (Gorilla gorilla), or three subspecies, the eastern lowland, western lowland, and mountain gorillas. Regardless of who you ask, all gorillas are endangered. There are probably only around 220,000 left in the wild. Habitat encroachment and poaching for bushmeat, trophies, and magical talismans have led to substantial losses. Because their social structure is so complex and because they reproduce slowly—with females only giving birth once every four years at best—the removal of even a fe
  9. Since 1996, the amur leopard has been classified by the IUCN as Critically Endangered with less than 70 individuals thought to exist today. It is hunted and killed for its beautiful fur, its habitat is being destroyed for human settlement and agricultural practices. Amazing Facts About the Amur Leopard Amur leopards have thick white or cream fur with large, widely spaced black spots called “rosettes” covering the head, back, tail and legs. Fur length varies from summer (0.7–0.9 in) to winter (2.8 in). How long is an Amur leopards tail? Amur leopards have long bushy tails of 32
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